Taking a breath

18-IMG_3968

The clear fresh air of Ireland’s Atlantic Coast

Taking a breath is the first thing and the last thing we do in life. It is something we do automatically without thinking, even while we sleep, even if we are unconscious. The statistics are ‘breathtaking’. On average, a person at rest takes about 16 breaths per minute. This means we breathe about 960 times an hour, 23,040 times a day, and 8,409,600 times a year. These numbers increase for children and for those who exercise. Most of the time we do not even notice that we are breathing – it just ‘happens’.

200px-Shramore_SetSome years ago I signed up for Irish set dancing classes, but after a few lessons found that I was so out of breath that I could barely continue. I put this down to being unfit, even though I was a regular walker, and often took to hill walking that I enjoyed. A few weeks later I contracted a chest infection that was so challenging that I thought I had reached the end of my days. Eventually after many doctor’s visits, a chest consultant diagnosed the condition, and I was put on a medicine regime that got me out of the woods. But my life had changed forever.

I was now a COPD patient and have become aware of every single breath I take. I had heard of COPD  before from a friend who had a family member who suffered with it. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease is the long name for a condition that covers a range of chest complaints. COPD is an incurable and progressive disease of the lungs. In about 80% of cases it is a consequence of smoking cigarettes,which I had done,although I had quit about 16 years before the diagnosis.

I was so so blessed to have a great GP and an excellent Respiratory Consultant at the Mid West Regional Hospital. Between them they set me on a course to manage this awful disease, and I am very thankful that for the most part it does not interfere with my normal life. Of course there are times when even taking a step can be a challenge, when simple things like  bending down to pick something off the floor results in awful coughing and gasping for air, when someone’s strong perfume leaves me breathless! When first diagnosed I tried everything to find out about the disease in Ireland, but the only hits Google returned were American sites and so I joined one of them to develop strategies to deal with exacerbations and to keep well. In 2013 COPD Support Ireland was formed to act as an advocacy body and to support those living or caring for someone with COPD.

COPD IrelandJust before Christmas 2015, I was invited to take part in filming in Dublin as part of an initiative to raise awareness of women who suffer from COPD. COPD Support Ireland and Novartis International AG,(a Swiss multinational pharmaceutical company), who manufacture COPD medications, had come together to produce informational films on COPD. I cannot adequately describe the feelings on that day, meeting fellow COPD sufferers for the very first time. Three other truly inspirational women with COPD were there for the filming. They have reached stages that are so much more severe than mine yet they are positive, funny, determined and truly inspirational!

Gerardine – beautiful, elegant, courageous. She had never smoked in her life, yet has been afflicted with COPD. Such quiet dignity – a truly impressive woman.

Paula – funny, laughing woman who dispensed an aura of kindness and compassion such that I had not experienced before. She exuded positiveness in a most inspirational way and it was a total joy to be in her company.

Pauline-   a wonderful woman who, on the day we met, was struggling with her COPD, yet is always ready to help others. Pauline has done trojan work to raise awareness of COPD in Louth and is the chairperson of the Louth COPD Support Group.  You can see and hear Pauline here. 

The World Health Organization estimates that more than 3 million people died of COPD in 2012. Untold millions suffer from it  across the world. There is an annual World COPD day that takes place each November to raise awareness of the condition.

image

It is possible to lead a normal life with COPD, especially in the early stages.

Top priorities for me are to avoid anyone who has a cold or flu symptoms, have fastidious hand hygiene and encourage others to do likewise, and avoid  irritants like tobacco smoke, strong perfumes, hairspray, dusty atmospheres, and never ever miss medications. I have lugged my trusty nebulizer across the world on several occasions  – it has been on three trips to Australia and caused consternation at several airport security points

My trusty Nebulizer, my constant companion, 'just in case' .

My trusty Nebulizer, my constant companion, ‘just in case’ .

I have never spoken of the fact that I have COPD. Very few of my friends are aware that I am a sufferer, although they would know that I sometimes get a really bad cough. Today I am proud to stand up and be counted with these wonderful courageous women,Pauline, Paula and Gerardine.

Many thanks to COPD Support Ireland, Damien Peelo their CEO, Novartis and most especially, Gerardine, Pauleen and Paula for inspiring me to go public about an awful disease, possibly self-inflicted in my case, but nonetheless a disease that deserves the attention and investment of governments in support of the legions of sufferers worldwide.

So the next time you stand at the coast and breathe in the clear air, or stand on top of a challenging mountain breathing in the crisp clean air, or bend over to smell a beautiful rose, think of those of us who have to work hard to take that breath that comes naturally to you  and love what you are experiencing for it is not guaranteed to all of us.

 

 

 

 

3 Comments

Filed under Ireland, Living in Ireland

Terry Wogan: From an Irish Convent to the IRA Bombings

This morning we heard the sad news of the death of Terry Wogan, an Irish-born broadcaster who for decades had various light entertainment programmes on TV and Radio mostly in the United Kingdom. It is reckoned that he may well have had the largest audiences of any broadcaster in the world. As the BBC compère for the Eurovision Song Contest he brought millions to their TV sets just to hear his witty comments. Even when living in Ireland we preferred to tune in to the BBC just for the fun of listening to him and his wry gentle sense of humour.
I first came across Terry Wogan when as a teenager I was incarcerated in the St. Louis Convent Boarding School in Dundalk, County Louth, hundreds of miles from home. In the rarefied atmosphere of all girls boarding school we were living in such an emotionally deficient bubble that we sometimes ‘fixated’ on people in the public domain. (Most especially male). The marriage of Ringo Starr of Beatles fame for example threw the entire school into disarray and at least one of our number cried for an entire term, such was her upset.
And likewise with the marriage of Terry Wogan to the lovely fashion model,Helen Joyce in 1965. I am not sure that I even knew much about him at that time! Ireland’s television service, just launched in 1961 was still in its infancy, but Terry Wogan had made a mark as a newsreader and announcer, he had been one of the TV commentators covering the 1963 visit of President Kennedy to Ireland. And he was handsome to boot. Yet he caused a stir when it became known that he had married Helen. Helen Joyce was probably as well-known as Terry for she regularly appeared in the Sunday newspaper (Sunday Press or Sunday Independent, I do not recall which). Each Sunday there was a strip of small photos of models modelling coats, or dresses, or hats with the name of the model added alongside.

Wogan Wedding

Terry Wogan marries Helen Joyce in 1965. (Image RTE Archives)

The marriage caused a great sense of disappointment. I clearly recall class mates being incredulous that Terry Wogan had done such a thing. How could he go off and get married! And besides,was she really THAT nice? Even though I was not really sure who he was I was caught up in the clamour of disbelief and the sense that perhaps he was not quite ‘of sound mind’ to have married at all! (These thoughts astonish me even now, but such was the lot of hormonal teenagers!)
Fast forward several years and I am an economic migrant living in London. In the 1970s IRA terrorists began bombing in the UK. It was a tough place to be Irish. Hardly a day passed without some hurtful remark or comment from work colleagues or shop assistants or bus conductors. Terry Wogan was by now presenting a morning radio show on the BBC. He held his head high throughout the atrocities. He never referred to the terror and the killings but remained proudly Irish and set a great example for those of us expats who lived and worked there. We watched footage of the carnage caused by so-called Irish patriots on TV in the evening and went to work listening to the soft Irish tones of Terry Wogan on his breakfast programme. To me personally his gentle quirky humour made it easier to be Irish in those dark times and his great good humour set me up for many a day as I headed to the office.
In the Telegraph Obituary published today John Humphrys of the Today programme ”put his finger on the Irishman’s secret: “It is just that he puts his audience at ease. That’s why they want to listen, because they feel better about themselves after they have listened to him. He has made the nation feel at ease with itself and that’s a great gift and we owe him a lot for that”. He certainly put a lot of expat Irish at ease during those awful times.

He also fronted the BBC presentation of the Annual Eurovision Song Contest which gave joy to millions as he gently berated the goings-on. His Eurovision quips were legendary, some of which can  be seen here .

But there are two quotes from him that I think sum him up:

About his long happy marriage of over 50 years to Helen: “If the present Mrs Wogan has a fault – and I must tread carefully here – this gem in the diadem of womanhood is a hoarder. She never throws anything out. Which may explain the longevity of our marriage.”

When he met the Queen of England (a regular listener to his programme) on a visit to the BBC she asked him how long he had worked at the BBC. He replied  ”Your Majesty, I’ve never worked here.”

Terry Wogan who broke the hearts of schoolgirls in 1965, has broken hearts again. While we rejoice that he has lived and are the better of it, the President of Ireland,The Queen of England, Prime Ministers of both the UK and Ireland, the Children in Need Charity which he started in 1980 and which has so far raised £300 million, his work colleagues in Ireland and London, his listeners and fans everywhere, and most especially his wife, children and grandchildren all mourn his passing on this day, January 31 2016.

Ochón! Ochón!

Terry Wogan after receieving his Knighthood at Buckingham palace in 2005 (Image Wikimedia Commons

Terry Wogan after receiving his Knighthood at Buckingham palace in 2005 (Image Wikimedia Commons)

 

23 Comments

Filed under Ireland, Irish Diaspora

On Growing Old

In my previous post on Retirement: Smelling roses, enjoying brandy and learning to spit, I quoted the Jenny Joseph poem When I Grow Old.
My friend Chris has crafted her much more elegant and stylish aspirations into a thoughtful poem for the distant day when she arrives in that time in her life.  I think it’s a beautiful poem that deserves to be widely read!

WHEN I GROW OLD…

WHEN I GROW OLD….
When I grow old, I will not long for youth,
rather I will celebrate what has gone before
and look forward to what each day brings.
I will enjoy the company of myself, as well as that of family and friends..
of new discoveries, of revisiting old interests and developing new ones.
I will revel in choosing yes or no or maybe.. without guilt or reason.
I will enjoy friendships, both near and far….
I will take time to watch butterflies flit among the flowers
and listen to bird song every day…
I will drench myself in summer showers..
and sing in the moonlight…
I will write what I wish and read all I can…
Silken threads will be my palette
as I create simple things of beauty…
I will surround myself with roses and violets and daisies
I will bake at midnight if I wish
and eat fruit and cream for tea…
When I grow old, I will be me…
 (c)Crissouli Jan 24, 2016
Inspired by the post of my friend… Angela…
Thank you Chris!
You can read more of her musings at The Back Fence of Genealogy .

5 Comments

Filed under Ageing in Ireland, Healthy Living, Ireland, Older & Bolder, Older Generation, Retirement Age, Seniors

Retirement: Smelling roses, enjoying brandy and learning to spit!

This is the third and final post on this trilogy on Retirement. My last two posts (here and here ) were  concerned with the very serious matters of mandatory retirement and the financial and social deprivation that were for me, the immediate fallout. March 2016 will see the 3rd anniversary of my compulsory retirement. The road was indeed a rocky one, and full of potholes, but now that I have travelled along it for a while, I have slipped into a ‘Third Age’ mentality and somehow seamlessly adapted to a life without the early morning alarm clock!

Some years ago my friend moved to live in London and I was amused by this little ditty that hung in her bathroom. Nicely framed, it was strategically placed so that any visiting females could not miss it.

WARNING!

When I am an old woman I shall wear purple
With a red hat which doesn’t go, and doesn’t suit me.
And I shall spend my pension on brandy and summer gloves
And satin sandals, and say we’ve no money for butter.
I shall sit down on the pavement when I’m tired
And gobble up samples in shops and press alarm bells
And run my stick along the public railings
And make up for the sobriety of my youth.
I shall go out in my slippers in the rain
And pick flowers in other people’s gardens And learn to spit.

You can wear terrible shirts and grow more fat
And eat three pounds of sausages at a go
Or only bread and pickle for a week
And hoard pens and pencils and beermats and things in boxes.

But now we must have clothes that keep us dry
And pay our rent and not swear in the street
And set a good example for the children.
We must have friends to dinner and read the papers.

But maybe I ought to practice a little now?
So people who know me are not too shocked and surprised
When suddenly I am old, and start to wear purple.

——–Jenny Joseph.

During the early weeks of retirement I read this poem again several times. Cares and woes can certainly knock the stuffing out of anyone. Should I let them do just that and should I then go about running a stick along the railings, driving everyone mad? Clack, clack, clackclackclackclack clack, clack clackclackclack? A possible option, for sure!

BUT, this was NOT for me! I needed to re-evaluate, to re energize, to REINVENT myself if need be. And so I took every single opportunity to be away from home or in the company of others. During my first summer of ‘retirement’ I plied the length and breath of Ireland attending conferences and talks, popping into Museums and Galleries, going to beautiful places near home that deserved investigation, discovering things I did not know, rediscovering things I did know. If there were free events, so much the better. The budget was stretched as tight as a bodhran skin, but one or two fewer visits to the hairdressers was ok, and I never really minded beans on toast as a meal, and miracle of miracles—you do need fewer clothes when you don’t have to go to work! So on went the jeans and the comfy jacket…. and away I went!

A trip to Australia to spend time with my daughter and her family worked its magic…maybe this retirement isn’t so bad after all, with no worries about using up precious leave! The following year, having reached my 66th birthday I became eligible for free travel travel in Ireland and this opened up a whole new world…a day away in Dublin to go to the theatre, a day strolling around Galway, a day shopping in Cork or a day enjoying the festival in Tralee…all for free!

It took about a year to adjust to not having to rise at 6.30 each morning. During that transition year I discovered the gift of TIME that I now have in abundance. I use it as far as I can to improve my changed life. There is time to seek out and select bargains, time  for long slow cooking and tasty recipes, time to walk, time to read, time to spend hours in the swimming pool, time to exercise, time to catch up with friends, time to do some volunteering work, time to study and learn new things, and time to smell the roses!

I have not yet spent my pension on brandy, but I do have time to enjoy the occasional glass and as for ‘learning to spit’ – I am working on that – figuratively speaking of course!

(Clipart Image)

I plan on wearing purple!

 

24 Comments

Filed under Age Action Ireland, Ageism, Ireland, Living in Ireland, My Oral History, Older Generation, Poetry, Retirement Age, Seniors

Retirement: A lament

This is the second of a trilogy of posts about my personal experience of mandatory retirement.

In my earlier post I mentioned that in Ireland Irish Labour T.D.(Member of Parliament) Anne Ferris, has tabled a Bill to abolish the mandatory retirement age. This Bill would prohibit employers imposing compulsory retirement ages on their employees. As a member of Age Action, I was asked to make a submission at the Public Hearings of the Committee stage of the Bill at Leinster House, the seat of our Parliament, the Oireachtas. This post can be seen here. Telling my story of compulsory retirement in Leinster House in November last, stirred painful memories of that difficult time, yet it was a bittersweet occasion. For the very first time, here I was, in a roomful of people who did not necessarily see retirement always as a happy huggy joyful state, but rather one that can create problems for many. It certainly was empowering to be there with people who shared my view or, at least wished to hear about the impact of compulsory retirement on someone forced to leave a job simply because of a birthday.

4a6f80261ba01de616da05afede634bd

Almost all discourse around retirement is that it’s ‘A Wonderful Thing’, a much yearned-for blissful state, that fills dreams for years leading up to the happy day. A quick Google search yields happy, light-hearted images of the joys and preoccupations of retirement, as can be seen in these illustrations. It’s all about having fun and doing fabulous things,or perhaps doing nothing at all, if that is more meaningful!

Only a few months ago I met a former colleague on the street in Limerick. ‘Oh’, she gushed, ‘Are you loving being retired? Are you having a fabulous time? Oh, how lucky you are not to have to go in to ‘that place’ every day!’ She meant very well and was being kind, but was rather taken aback and puzzled at my response. I am tired of the pretence and ‘going along’ with the happy chirpy notion of retirement that is NOT my experience, I responded: ‘None of the above’. I loved working there, I miss my friends and I miss the money’. The poor woman did not know what to say –  ‘Ah, you don’t mean that at all’, she said. But I did mean every word of it for that is the reality of MY retirement.

d7ae2973ca013f30fb42ad3867d35c82There is absolutely no doubt whatsoever that many people, possibly the most, cannot wait for retirement. With children reared and gone and the mortgage paid off,the prospect of many years of hard work coming to an end is very appealing. This was and is particularly true in my workplace,where colleagues who had been in service for decades,often since leaving school or college,are eager for retirement after 40 years service,or very close to it. Dreams of travelling, doing voluntary work, spending more time with friends and family,long weeks soaking up summer sunshine, all on the list of new adventures just waiting to be enjoyed.

But not by all. In the early days of the then New Year of 2013, I had feelings of fear and dread that pervaded my every waking moment. The realization that my working life would grind to a halt in just three months filled me with panic. Anyone facing compulsory retirement and who lacks the means to continue in a comfortable lifestyle will await the dreaded date and the official dismissal letter with a heavy heart. Rather than being an occasion for celebration, it is in reality a very dark time. How would I pay the mortgage and Health Insurance? How could I manage Doctors bills and carry out repairs to the house? How would I keep warm all day-long at home when I was used to being in a comfortable centrally heated office? How would I meet other financial commitments? Would I have enough money for food, and the right type of food, to keep me well?  Could I afford to run a car? All these things milled about in my head for weeks and months, gnawing away at me, keeping me awake at night. The bank was unsympathetic about mortgage repayments, which would run for some years after my reduction in pay. They would, they said, deal with any arrears issues as they arose but sent me out a letter with heavy black print stating that I could lose my home if mortgage payments were not made as they fell due. Not only that, they also advised that I was already in arrears and every few weeks for a period of 15 months the threatening letters arrived, in spite of phone calls and hours of discussion. As it turned out they had made a mistake and there were no arrears, but that did not even warrant an apology.

But it was not only about loss of income.The loss of  a way of life, the daily interaction with friends and colleagues was of equal importance to me. Living alone in a rural location I had all the peace and quiet I needed after work or at weekends. Working in an office with over 500 people was rather like living in a small village for part of my day and I enjoyed the camaraderie of it all. Not only that, I also enjoyed the daily drive of 45 minutes or so each way, to and from the office.

In March 2013, in the days following compulsory retirement from my job of almost 20 years, I wrote the post below.  There are many aspects to forced retirement, similar I daresay to compulsory redundancy. The difference is that my job still existed, but I was no longer eligible to do what I had done well for a long number of years simply because it was my birthday. the prospects of finding work in Ireland once you have passed the age of 55 are practically non-existent. The terrible reality is that this ageist stance by employers is accepted as being ‘ok’. And the state is the worst offender. In 2008 Ireland’s most experienced detective, Assistant Commissioner Martin Donnellan mounted a High Court challenge to the law that made him retire at age 60. He lost.

The loss to me was at many levels, financial for sure, and at a social and personal level that bewildered me for a long time afterwards.  These were my thoughts at that time. The original post can be seen here.

The rising sun was turning the sky the deepest reddish pink as it edged towards the horizon to the east. I watched it for almost the entire journey and wondered how long it might be before I travel this road again and witness the dawn.There was no other traffic at this  early hour, so I was able to drive reasonably slowly to savour the journey in the quiet of this cold, clear  spring morning.

100_6800

The River Maigue and Castle Desmond in September

Crossing the bridge on the River Maigue has been a highlight of my life on each  morning that I have commuted across here for the past 20 years. Sometimes it is mysteriously misty, sometimes it is golden and lit by the rising sun, sometimes it is moonlit, most times it is just ordinarily beautiful.

MaigueAug11

River Maigue and Desmond Castle in August

I  arrived very early to the office as there were things I needed to do before the buzz of new arrivals – drawers to be emptied, confidential papers to be shredded, files to be organized and a day’s  work to be done.  I (exceptionally!) walked up the 8 flights of stairs to  take a look again at the streetscape below. I continued on to the top floor  to get a cup of coffee and to look east wards again at the rose coloured  sky forming a beautiful canvas for the tall spire of St John’s Cathedral and the tops of the city buildings.

100_6818

The River Shannon on a beautiful misty morning

I have had an extraordinary bonus of enjoying some of the most beautiful scenery in Ireland every time  I looked up from my desk to see the River Shannon coursing below.

100_6475

The moody and ever-changing River Shannon flows by my office

I had developed a habit in recent times of taking photographs, as the River looks different almost every time you look at it.

100_7592

The Shannon is a very fast flowing river. The Abbey River flows into it on the lower right.

Being tidal, the river is constantly changing, rising and falling some 18 feet twice a day. In winter when there is heavy rain we may not see the stony river bed for months on end.

100_7587

Morning light on the Shannon

Colleagues arrived. There was debate about the news items of the day that impinge on everyone, including the new property tax – the pincers tightening yet again! Morale was not high on that particular day, but after some light-hearted banter we ‘got on with it’. I was surprisingly busy with phone calls to make, notes to write up.

 

View from my desk. (Copyright A .Gallagher)

View from my desk.

So this was it! One of my lunch group reminded me that it was time for lunch and I said that I had to pop out and that  I might be a while. (I was doing some research on Antarctic Explorers then , and ‘borrowed’ the quote!).

At about 1.45 pm I logged out of my computer, gathered up my security passes, placed them in an envelope, put on  my coat and walked away from my good friends, and hundreds of colleagues (most great, many very good and a small forgettable  few).  I was  walking away from a job that I loved, with tons of mental stimulation, camaraderie and social interaction as well as  wonderful scenery and the daily joyrides that were my commute to and from work. I had already hinted to close friends that they would not be given advance notice of my exact day of departure, and I was grateful that my managers respected my need for privacy. So I was able to ‘exit’ quietly.

Mandatory retirement is no longer allowed in many countries. Most people can now work for as long as they want, without fear of discrimination but here in Ireland it is ‘statutory’ for some employees who commenced employment prior to 2004 to retire at age 65.  It seems extraordinary that a person can go to bed at age 64 as an asset to the workforce, doing a good job efficiently and well for many years, yet wake up on their 65th birthday as unemployable. This is of particular significance in a country that is in the throes of an economic depression with huge numbers of people seeking non-existent jobs. Of course my ‘mandatory’ departure date did not come as any surprise. Long term contingencies were very quickly rendered useless however by the rapidly changing  social and economic conditions in Ireland in recent years – not least of which has been that my once geographically  closest family members have relocated to a place 10,000 miles away.

Officially ‘on holiday’ for another week, I plan on spending that time lamenting the loss of the social interaction of a large office and delighting in the friendships I made there. It is too early to reinvent – time enough for that in the weeks and months ahead. For now, I will relish the light-hearted moments and laughter that were bound to come along every day, as well as the quippy and often black humour that abounded in the place.

I will  recall the always cheerful early morning  greeting of the delightful woman in the canteen, for whom nothing was too much trouble! I will delight in the memory of companionship at early coffee, when you would not know who might happen along on an early break, and I will still ‘hear’ the very familiar footsteps of a special friend coming along the corridor, always looking beautiful and armed with her designer shopping bag and with her lively daily greeting of ‘Bonj’ before she rushed away to her ‘career’.

At lunch, we had time to bond – shepherded along by our ever precise and delightful clock-watcher, always in good humour and who managed to organize us all in the most charming way. Bringing up the rear was  our ‘Drama Queen’ who regaled us with stories ranging from her amateur drama society escapades to a too-close ‘encounter’ with shampoo on a shop floor, to the hazards of Roman toe ( or was it Greek?). These two, together with the above mentioned career girl and myself made up the hardcore lunch table. If we arrived slightly early we might join our ever thoughtful, ever smiling, quietly spoken elegant and wise friend, who always has time for whoever is in her presence.  From time to time we would be joined by the  ever-cheerful woman of the West  with the hearty laugh and oodles of common sense, or the witty ‘cuttie’ (girl) from further north who always had a sideways but pleasant view on life to make us smile. Sometimes another quiet but stalwart friend might join us – IF she remembered it was lunchtime – but invariably 20 minutes late! There are several others who fall into the ‘very special’ category and whose company was always well worth seeking out and one or two ‘long distance’ colleagues who had left our particular place. These too are a huge loss to me, and I am forever grateful for all of them.

I will miss all of this. I will miss these very special friends who were part of my days, part of my weeks, part of my joys, part of my tribulations, part of my highs, part of my lows, part of my hoots of laughter!  We have lived through births, marriages, deaths, personal trials and challenges both IN and BECAUSE of  friendship. I will not ever be able to replace any of this. It  is of its time and of its place.  Now is a time to remember. Now is a time to be glad for all of it. Now is a time to shed a tear or two.  Now is a time to smile at these memories.  Now, and always, I  will lament their passing.

The terrible reality is that this ageist stance by employers in Ireland is accepted as being ‘ok’ at a state level, at national level, as well as by ordinary people who seem to accept that to be a certain age is ‘too old’. Life and society have changed.People enjoy better health and longer lives; societal relationships break up and break down; people have children later in life. There are a myriad of reasons why people should not be compelled to retire at age 60 or 65 so long as they are fit to do the job.

Those of us who had to retire have had no choice but to get on with our lives as best we can. There is no doubt but that there is something to be said for having leisure time in abundance, but what we ask for is a choice, to stay part of the workforce for as long as we must, and for as long as we can do a good job and continue to contribute to society and avoid being a drain on it.

 

References:

http://www.irishtimes.com/news/senior-garda-challenges-compulsory-retirement-age-of-60-1.1216158

 

6 Comments

Filed under Age Action Ireland, Family History, Living in Ireland, My Oral History, Retirement Age

Age Discrimination in Ireland: Adding a voice

This is the first of three posts on my personal experience of mandatory retirement in Ireland.

Irish Labour TD (Member of Parliament) Anne Ferris has tabled a Bill to abolish mandatory retirement age. The Employment Equality (Abolition of Mandatory Retirement Age) Bill would prohibit employers imposing compulsory retirement ages on their employees. In November last, as a member of Age Action, I was asked to take part in their presentation at the Public Hearings of the Committee stage of the Bill at Leinster House,the seat of our Parliament, the Oireachtas, in Dublin.

Leinster House (Kildare St. entrance)

Leinster House, Dublin. Ireland’s Parliament. (Image oireachtas.ie)

This was my first visit to the Oireachtas and it was appropriate that I was there on a mission about a matter very dear to my heart. I had to vacate my job on my 65th birthday. At age 64 and 364 days I was an acceptable employee, but one day later I was unemployable. My ‘shelf life’ was up; my ‘use by’ date had been reached. Indeed I was fully aware for a long time that my career would grind to a halt at age 65, but I had hoped against hope that new provisions whereby public sector employees who joined after 2004 would not have to retire at age 65, could be extended to serving staff members.This was not to be and my pleas fell on deaf ears. The mandatory retirement age of 65 in the public sector department in which I worked was written in stone, and so agreed with the trade unions. In some departments the mandatory retirement age is 60.

Most of my public sector work colleagues are delighted to retire at age 65 or sooner. Many of them have long service and look forward to the day when they no longer have to work for a living. Some of my colleagues however,dread the day when their earning power is decimated. Like me, they may have entered pensionable employment later in life or they may have been subjected to the highly discriminatory ‘marriage bar’ that only ended in Ireland in the early 1970s. (The marriage bar meant that upon marriage, female employees were no longer eligible to work in the public sector and banks). Shorter working lives means smaller pensions. On retirement, I suffered a loss of income of 75%, yet my household bills, my medical bills and my mortgage still had to be serviced out of the reduced income. As the Dickens character Mr Micawber famously stated in the book David Copperfield, Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure nineteen pounds,nineteen shillings and six pence, result happiness. Annual income twenty pounds, annual expenditure twenty pounds ought and six, result misery.”

Committee Lobby

The Committee Lobby in Leinster House. (Image oireachtas.ie)

It was a privilege to be able to add my voice at the Public Hearings of the Committee stage of the proposed legislation at Leinster House and to hear the heartfelt submissions being made by other participants. Some fearful of losing their jobs at compulsory retirement age because of ongoing family commitments, such as children at university for example, mortgage to pay. Others simply wanted to be able to stay and continue doing a good job as they had done for some time, some angry at having to lose their jobs at a particular age, yet not qualifying for state pension for some years afterwards or despairing of a system that allows for the casting aside of a wealth of experience as with doctors and nurses in our health service, just because of an accidental birthday.

Below are links to the official tapes of the Public Hearings at Leinster House. The recording begins at about 34 minutes in, with Age Action opening statement at 36.50 and my (very wobbly) contribution at 39 minutes mark. .

https://oireachtas.heanet.ie/mp4/cr2/cr2_20151118T090000.000005.mp4

There are two further tapes covering all the submissions and discussions at
https://oireachtas.heanet.ie/mp4/cr2/cr2_20151118T090000.000006.mp4 and
https://oireachtas.heanet.ie/mp4/cr2/

In the aftermath of the submissions, I was asked to take part in a number of interviews by the media. Ocean FM, a radio station serving the Sligo/South Donegal area still has a podcast available at this link:

Donegal Woman Claims Age Discrimination At Being Forced To Retire From Job, NWT, Thurs, 19th Nov . I am unsure about how long the link will remain live.

Other interviews were aired on the Pat Kenny Show on  Newstalk and on Highland Radio while the Irish Daily Mail carried articles on two separate days.

Just before Christmas the Final Report  to Government was published and can be seen here.  The Report recommends a change to the existing law and we look forward to a time when  this will become a reality.

http://www.oireachtas.ie/parliament/media/committees/justice/Final-Report—Retirement-Age.pdf

I would like to express my thanks to Justin Moran and all the Age Action team who do such wonderful work  in raising awareness of issues that directly affect the quality of life of older people in Ireland.

 

 

9 Comments

Filed under Age Action Ireland, Ageism, Ireland, Living in Ireland, Older workers, Seniors, Social Change, Social Justice

A Happy New Year!

Wishing all readers of this blog across the world a  very Happy New Year! Many thanks for following and commenting on my posts throughout 2015new-year-2016-firework!

7 Comments

Filed under Ireland