Monthly Archives: October 2016

Discovering landmarks and Family History on Blacksod Bay, County Mayo

Continuing along Ireland’s Wild Atlantic Way, rain and low grey cloud were my only companions as I headed into this remote Irish-speaking part of County Mayo. Although visibility was reduced it was still possible to enjoy some lovely sights. The Irish-only road signs were something of a challenge at first, even though I am used to our bilingual signs here in Ireland and Irish-only signs in Donegal, and other Gaeltacht areas, these places were not familiar to me. However, once I figured out that ‘An Fod Dubh’ meant ‘Blacksod’ and that therefore ‘Chuan and Fhóid Duibh’ was Blacksod Bay, I chugged along happily in the beautiful Mullet Peninsula that protects Blacksod Bay from the worst of the Atlantic weather.

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Trá Oilí or Elly Beach

This eye catching beach is one of many big sandy beaches in the area. It sports the Blue Flag, one of the world’s most recognised eco-labels, indicating that it complies with a specific set of criteria on water quality, information points, environmental education, safety and beach management. Raining or not, this is a good beach for swimming!

Tír Sáile – the North Mayo Sculpture Trail –is the largest public arts project ever undertaken in Ireland.  Several of these sites are located here on the Mullet peninsula. This work is entitled ‘Deirbhile’s Twist’ and I like that it was formed by raising large granite boulders already lying around on the ground and arranging them into an eye catching feature. This is located at Falmore which is a beautiful location, even in the mist!

Saint Deirbhile (Dervilla) is a local saint who arrived at Falmore in the 6th Century. Arriving by donkey she was pursued by an unwanted suitor who,so the story goes, was very attracted to her beautiful eyes. Rather drastically she plucked them out to discourage him and he left, heartbroken. Water gushed from the spot where her eyes fell and after bathing her sockets her sight was restored. The ruins of her convent are here near the seashore with Deirbhile’s Well nearby. Modern day pilgrims believe that water from the well can help cure eye complaints and they come here for special devotion on August 15 each year.

Ruins of Dervilla's Monastery

Ruins of Dervilla’s Convent

And then on to the site I was particularly interested in – Blacksod weather station, situated at the end of the peninsula.

This is Blacksod Lighthouse, looking very unlike a traditional lighthouse, perched atop an old granite building that dates from 1864. This is a very significant place because it was from here that a weather report issued on 3rd June 1944 changed the course of history. The World War 2 D-Day landings scheduled for June 5th were delayed because of the hourly weather report lodged by Irish Coast Guardsman and lighthouse keeper Ted Sweeney, which indicated that there would be adverse conditions in the English Channel for the following few days. Blacksod was of particular significance because it was the first land-based observation station in Europe where weather readings could be professionally taken on the prevailing European Atlantic westerly weather systems. Ted’s report on June 3rd mentioned a rapidly falling barometer and strong winds which would have augured badly for the planned invasion. A further report from Ted at 12pm on June 4, said ‘heavy rain and drizzle cleared, cloud at 900 feet and visibility on land and sea very clear’. This meant that better weather was on the way for the south of England, and so Operation Overlord went ahead on June 6th 1944 with calm clear conditions in the English Channel.

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Plaque at Blacksod Lighthouse

There is a nice little harbour alongside the lighthouse, Termon Pier, which was almost totally deserted when I was there with only rain and wind to be heard and seen and a few currachs pulled up out of the water.

Winds were picking up the rain was relentless so it was time to leave. I was delighted that I had made the trip out here and discovered a few sights, in spite of the conditions.  Suddenly there was an incredible noise that almost deafened me and for the life of me I could not figure out what on earth it was.  On turning round I saw a helicopter had just taken off from right beside me, as  there is a Helicopter Landing base beside the Lighthouse!

A helicopter lifts off

A helicopter lifts off.

I left here very pleased with my foray into this area, and with the few treasures I had discovered. However, the Mullet Peninsula had one more surprise in store as not far along the road I  came upon Ionad Naomh Deirbhile, a local Visitor and Heritage Centre.

img_1292Although they were about to close I was invited in for tea and a homemade scone and here discovered the story of The Tuke Fund assisted emigrants. It is not always recognized that hunger in Ireland did not end with the famines of 1845- 1852 and 1879. Hunger and deprivation were a fact of life in poorer districts of the western seaboard in particular, with hundreds of families needing relief into the mid 1880s and beyond. James Hack Tuke (1819-1896) was an English Quaker who made it his mission to aid people suffering from starvation and deprivation in the West of Ireland. One of the features of the Tuke Fund assisted migration was that only entire families would be facilitated, thereby freeing up smallholdings for another family. The emigrants were provided with the fare and money to enable them settle in their new locations.  In 1883 and 1884, 3,300 emigrants left North West Mayo and Achill, boarding ships in Blacksod Bay.  They sailed on 10 separate voyages, for Boston and Quebec. There are impressive storyboards at the centre, where descendants of those who left here almost 140 years ago are welcomed. One such family arrived while I was there. It is reckoned that over 2 million people are descended from these North Mayo emigrants

The research on the Blacksod Tuke Emigration scheme was carried out by Rosemarie Geraghty, I believe for her thesis. Rosemarie has researched the 10 ships manifests that carried these families to their new lives in what she describes as the time of the  ‘forgotten famine’  and is absolutely delighted when descendants arrive here in search of their roots. I asked her what the charges are for family research and she said ‘They left here with nothing, we are never going to charge them to know where they came from.’ Rosemarie is ably assisted by Norah Cawley, a superb scone maker who makes visitors feel very welcome indeed. I have been to many a family research centre before, but never one like this – with such enthusiasm, warmth,  passion  and great scone making!

All of this information with family names  is available free to view, and is searchable under various headings, at http://www.blacksodbayemigration.ie . They just love to hear from anyone wherever in the world whose ancestors may have left this beautiful place over 130 years ago.

On what was a miserable wet grey cloudy day, how lucky was I to discover such wonderful silver linings at the Mullet Peninsula and on the shores of Blacksod Bay!  More treasures of the Wild Atlantic Way – Beidh mé arais arís!

 

St Deirbhile Stained Glass window at the Centre.

St Deirbhile Stained Glass window at the Centre.

References

http://www.independent.ie/irish-news/how-blacksod-lighthouse-changed-the-course-of-the-second-world-war-30319681.html

http://www.blacksodbayemigration.ie/

http://www.museumsofmayo.com/deirbhile.htm

 

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Filed under Emigration from Ireland, Family History, Ireland, Ireland and the World, Irish Countryside, Irish Diaspora, Irish History, Mayo Emigrants

Remembering Dave Gallaher, Donegal man, First All Blacks Captain

The first touring All Blacks rugby side to play Munster was the famous “Original” All Blacks who lined out against them in the Markets Field, Limerick in November 1905. Munster were defeated 33–0. On that day, the victorious New Zealand All Blacks were captained by an Irishman from Donegal, the legendary Dave Gallaher.

I grew up in Donegal and am very familiar with one of Donegal’s most beautiful villages, Ramelton, which sits on the banks of the River Lennon. In this village on 30 October 1873 my namesake David Gallagher was born into a relatively comfortable family. His father was a shopkeeper, his mother a school teacher. When David was 5 years old, the family left Ramelton for the Bay of Plenty, New Zealand. They settled in Katikati, on the North Island where David’s mother Maria, became the local schoolteacher. Maria died in 1887 at the tragically young age of 42, leaving 11 children without a mother.

Two years later, the 17-year old Dave Gallaher (as he was now known) went to Auckland and played rugby – first for the Parnell Club and then the Ponsonby Club from 1896. In that year he also debuted at provincial level. His rugby career was interrupted when in 1901, he joined the New Zealand Contingent of Mounted Rifles to fight in the Boer War. At a farewell dinner, it is reported that the popular rugby player was ‘presented with a well filled purse of sovereigns’.

Safely home, he resumed his rugby career and played for New Zealand in the first ever encounter with the British and Irish Lions in 1904, and in 1905 he captained the legendary ‘Originals’ All Black team that toured Britain, France and North America.

The 1905 Original All Blacks (Image via Wikipedia)

This was the first time that the New Zealand team toured beyond Australasia and it was the first time that the name ‘All Black’ had been used. The 5-month tour was a triumph for Gallaher’s team as they scored 976 points and conceded only 59 in 35 matches. They won 34 and lost only 1 against Wales (controversy still rages about a referee decision that cost them the match!).

Dave Gallaher (Image via Wikipedia)

Following retirement as a team player, Dave Gallaher remained an influential figure in rugby. He continued as a selector for Auckland and for the All Blacks from 1907 to 1914. He co wrote a coaching manual, The Complete Rugby Footballer, that is still widely consulted to this day.

Dave volunteered to fight in World War 1 and it is believed that he changed his date of birth to enable him to do so, as he was exempt from conscription because of his age. (His youngest brother Douglas had been killed in action in France the previous year.)

Following training in England, on 26 June 1917 his unit went into action in the Third Battle of Ypres where they fought in the La Basse Ville area. At the rest camps in late August intensive training began for the battle that became known as Passchendaele. About the same time the region experienced the heaviest rain in 30 years that effectively turned the area into a muddy swamp. On October 1, he marched through the battle ravaged town of Ypres, and 3 days later….

”In drizzly rain, he had advanced through the deep mud of a small river and up the slopes ready to take over from the leading battalions for the second stage of the attack. A strong westerly wind chilled him to the bone and he waited for his orders. It was as he took over that his men came under heavy fire from a German stronghold named Korek, situated on the highest point of Graventafel ridge, and Dave Gallaher became one of the 330 New Zealanders to lose their lives in what is known as the Battle of Broodseinde”

Gallaher had been hit in the head by shrapnel and died some hours later, on October 4, just weeks short of his 44th birthday. Of the 9 brothers in the Gallaher family, 5 fought in the Great War. Douglas was wounded in action at Gallipoli on May 4 1915 and killed in action at Laventie, France on June 3 1916. Dave was killed in action on 4 October 1917 and Henry was killed in action on 24 April 1918. Henry’s twin brother Charles, was shot in the back in Gallipoli and survived for some years with a bullet lodged close to his spine. Laurence survived the war without any recorded injury.

The Grave of Dave Gallaher (Image wikimedia.commons)

Dave Gallaher is buried at Nine Elms Cemetery, Poperinge, Belgium, not far from The Island of Ireland Peace Park in Messines, Belgium. His grave, which bears the New Zealand emblem the Silver Fern, so proudly worn on the All Black shirt, has become a place of pilgrimage for All Black teams touring France.

The All Blacks kit with embroidered Poppy (Image Wikimedia. Commons)

The All Blacks have also been known to wear an embroidered poppy on the jersey sleeve to honour their countrymen who died in the battlefields of Europe during both World Wars. 12 All Blacks died in World War 1 and 2 died in World War 2. Their team proudly remembers them and all New Zealanders who lost their lives on fields of conflict.

Bronze at Eden Park Stadium, Auckland. (Image Wikimedia.Commons)

The name of Dave Gallaher lives on and continues to be remembered in the world of Rugby. In 1922, the Gallaher Shield became the trophy for Auckland club competitions and since 2000 the Dave Gallaher Cup has been awarded to the winner of the first rugby test between New Zealand and France in any year. Standing outside Eden Park Stadium in Auckland is a bronze statue of Dave Gallaher. Standing 2.7 metres high, this imposing statue is fitting testament to the esteem in which Dave Gallaher is held.

Meanwhile in Donegal, Dave Gallaher is proudly remembered. His home town Ramelton has honoured him with the lovely Dave Gallaher Park .

Dave Gallaher Park, Ramelton, Co Donegal. (Image Ramelton Tidy Towns)

Just up the road in Letterkenny, the local rugby club has named their home ground ‘Dave Gallaher Memorial Park’. There was great excitement in the area in 2005 when the All Blacks visited Donegal to connect with and honour the remarkable Dave Gallaher, who changed the face of rugby forever.

Dave Gallaher, First All Blacks Rugby captain, Rugby legend, Donegal Man, Soldier, is remembered today 99 years after his death at the Battle of Broodseinde.

(From an original post on this blog in October 2011)

References

The history of Wales versus New Zealand at t Rugbyrelics.com

Rugby History at Rugby Football History- Rugby at War.

History Learning Site – Passchendaele at http://www.historylearningsite.co.uk/battle of passchendaele.htm 

Ramelton at http://rameltontidytowns.squarespace.com

Dave Gallaher 1873- 1917 at http://www.davegallaher.com

Letterkenny Rugby Club

 

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Landslide! Pullathomas Co. Mayo.

Visiting the uniquely interesting Ceide Fields was a damp experience and as I left there heading west on my trip along the Wild Atlantic Way in June of this year, conditions became even wetter, with persistent view-blocking rain. It was disappointing to be in this beautiful area for the first time in inclement weather but I saw enough to be sufficiently captivated to resolve to return again….sooner rather than later.

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The rain was lashing down..

As I drove along with Sruwaddacon Bay to my right, windscreen wipers at full tilt, I came across a very ‘odd looking’ graveyard on the side of the hill. I pulled up to investigate and couldn’t quite make out why this place did not look ‘quite right’ for want of a better term.

Something didn't look 'quite right'

Something didn’t look ‘quite right’

I was quite amazed then to discover that this beautifully situated graveyard had suffered after very heavy rain some years ago when a landslide send thousands of tons of mud down the hill and carried coffins into the sea, never to be recovered. This catastrophic event took place in  September 2003 and the signs of it are clearly visible today.

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The catastrophic landslide was blamed on overgrazing by sheep as the heather and upland plants were no longer able to bind the peaty soil together. The torrential downpours came after a particularly dry summer and the hillside was turned into mud that slid down the hill into the sea. I cannot begin to imagine what it must have been like for families whose graves had vanished under the tons of mud.

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A plaque commemorates the awful event in 2003

There are three distinct sections to the graveyard at this site, but only the one in the foreground was affected by the landslide.

imageSteps have now been taken to make sure that there will be no repeat of this awful event,with  barriers installed to hold back any further soil slippage.

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The location is quite beautiful, with the seashore only feet away.

This graveyard is also known as Kilcommon graveyard or  Pollatomish graveyard. There is an excellent website here that has details of those buried there and, unusually, includes people for whom there are no headstones.

Had it not been pouring rain, I may not have noticed this site as I drove by.  A beautiful place for sure, one that reminds us of the power of nature which we should never underestimate.

 

Further reading:

http://goldenlangan.com/graves-pt.html

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