Tag Archives: County Kerry

Postcards from..

Some of the most popular and viewed posts I put on this site are in the series ”POSTCARDS FROM…”where I post snaps from places I happen to visit or pass through. These are mostly places in Ireland where I live. Many of them are a little off the beaten track, almost in a hidden Ireland but all are ‘Real’ Ireland.

I have created a new page on my site where I will place links to the posts in the series. The list will be added to from time to time. I hope you will enjoy!

The link to the page is HERE , but below is a list of all the places so far!

Places in Ireland 

Newcastle West, Co Limerick August 2013
Moneygall, Co. Offaly, ancestral home of Barack Obama. August 2013
Dublin September 2013.
Kells Co Meath January 2014
Bunratty, Co Clare, May 2014
Dun Laoghaire, Co Dublin August 2014
Rathkeale, Co. Limerick September 2014
Dingle, Co Kerry on Ireland’s Wild Atlantic Way July 2015
Shanagolden, Co Limerick August 2015
Bere Island, Co Cork September 2015.

Places outside Ireland

Serpentine National Park, Western Australia January 2015

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Centuries of history in Tarbert Co Kerry

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Tarbert House, whose new windows will arrive this week.

Set in the heart of ancient woodland that skirts Tarbert Bay is a magnificent house that dates from 1690. This is Tarbert House an internationally known heritage building, that has been home to the Leslie family since the late 17th Century. The Leslie family arrived in these parts after being on the winning side of the Battle of the Boyne and count bishops and various titled Leslies in their ancestry. Currently undergoing renovations, the three storey house over a basement is an imposing structure with lovely views of rolling countryside and of the River Shannon.

With the Shanid Historical Society, I was privileged to visit this historic home last weekend with the impressive and knowledgeable Ursula Leslie as our guide. She provided us with a wealth of information about so many aspects of the history of this place; the family, the visitors, the contents. For the purposes of this post I will concentrate on just a few of the features I loved the most – the entrance hall, furniture and some assorted beautiful things.

The entrance hall is more of a huge room than a hall in the modern sense, and through it have stepped some significant historic figures, including Charlotte Bronte, Winston Churchill, Daniel O’Connell, Jonathan Swift and Benjamin Franklin. John Paul Jones, the father of the American Navy took refuge here.The Leslie family

The entrance hall with its elegant plasterwork coving had many uses. Here weapons were stored, family portraits graced the walls and entertainment was provided.

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Entrance to Tarbert House. (Window shutters on the beautiful deep windows were closed as windows are being replaced )

Here is a most unusual fireplace –  one of a few in the house that are original and do not have a mantel.

An original fireplace - without a mantel

An original fireplace – without a mantel

One of the most striking features of the entrance are the armour racks above the doors and on the walls.

There are some excellent examples of original Irish furniture here – typified by being made from solid wood and not veneered. My favourite pieces are the chairs which were reversed and used when watching entertainment such as cock-fighting!

Some examples of solid Irish furniture in the hall – a wonderful couch with very solid feet and a very elegant table!

The next room  had stunning views of the Shannon

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and an eclectic collection of items from silverware to furniture to household items. At each end of the room is a beautifully carved mirror.

I loved these two pieces – a ‘campaign’ chair  that predates Ikea and flat pack furniture by some time, and a campaign  chest

And how about some curtains that date from 1870…..that’s right, 1870! The pattern has been copied, most famously by Nancy Regan, and is known as the Tarbert Rose. The fabric is not heavy and seems to be possibly silk , and is very beautiful

Three more images that will stay with me

There is also  an extensive collection of artwork in this house, including many portraits of members of the Leslie family and a parchment dating from 1813, petitioning the British House of Commons for Catholic Emancipation.

imageThe house is crammed full of beautiful objects,each having a history and/or a story to tell. They are also very clearly part of a family, part of a home.

This house is open for visiting by appointment, in May, July and August each year and is well worth a visit, for Ursula Leslie will charm every one of her guests with stories,knowledge and facts that are truly astounding!

 

 

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In Dublin’s Fair City

Last weekend I was in Dublin for a family occasion and stayed – for the very first time – in the rejuvenated  docklands  at Sir Rogerson’s Quay. I have long wanted to see at first hand the cleverly designed, harp shaped new bridge over the River Liffey …and there it was – right on the doorstep of our hotel! In the quiet traffic free hours of a Sunday morning I took a stroll along this lovely part of the South Bank.

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The Samuel Beckett Bridge, having ‘the appearance of a harp lying on its side ‘

The Samuel Beckett Bridge carries both vehicles and pedestrians and is, in my opinion,one of the most beautiful structures in Dublin.

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The Convention Centre, Dublin

Right alongside the bridge is another stunning structure – the world-class Dublin Convention Centre, with its tilted glass cylinder  beautifully reflected in the  Liffey waters.

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The Dublin Convention Centre from Samuel Beckett Bridge

The Convention Centre dissected by the stays of the Samuel  Becket Bridge.

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A view of Dublin City through the Samuel Beckett Bridge

Looking back towards the City Centre, some of Dublin’s iconic structures are framed by elements of the bridge. The tall building is  Liberty Hall. Built in the 1960s it is renowned for its non pleasing appearance, but is nevertheless an integral part of the Dublin sky-scape. In total contrast, the green dome is atop one of the most beautiful buildings in Dublin, the fabulous Gandon designed  18th century Custom House. The tall spire to the right of the dome is the Monument of Light, otherwise known as The Spire, reaching 121.2 metres into the Dublin sky.This very elegant and modern  stainless steel structure has been part of the Dublin skyline since 2002.

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Liberty Hall, The Custom House and The Spire ‘through the eye’ of Samuel Beckett Bridge

Another view of 3 of Dublin’s iconic structures, all on the north side of the River Liffey,  from the Samuel Beckett Bridge.

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Ulster Bank Headquarters, on the Liffey South Bank, from Samuel Beckett Bridge.

Equally iconic, although a recent addition to the Dublin sky scape, is the glass, multi-roofed building that is  the headquarters of the Ulster Bank. It looks very spectacular at night especially when approaching the city from the north side.

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The Jeanie Johnston Replica Famine Ship.

Moored  between Séan O’Casey Bridge and the Samuel Beckett Bridge, with the Custom House in the left background, is the replica famine ship, the Jeanie Johnston. Built about 2002 in County Kerry, she is a replica of the original that sailed between Tralee in County Kerry and North America from  1847 to 1855. The Jeanie Johnston was  remarkable in that no life was ever lost on the difficult voyages between Ireland and the New World. She is open to the public. I boarded her when she was tied up in Fenit, County Kerry, some years ago and she is well worth a visit to see at first hand what the living conditions were like for the emigrants who sailed in her.

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Statue of Mayo-man Admiral William Brown, ‘Father of the Argentine Navy’

A few yards from the Samuel Beckett Bridge, on the seaward side, stands a statue of  Admiral William Brown, or Guillermo Brown as he is known in Argentina. This illustrious Irish emigrant  changed the history of South America. This piece is from the Connaught Telegraph :

”Admiral William Brown, the hero of Garcia, Montevideo and Los Pozos, is acknowledged as ‘the father of Argentina’s Navy.’But he was even more than all that. He was a champion and friend of human liberty and the emancipator of a whole nation. In fact, the entire continent of South America owes him a debt of gratitude that can never be fully repaid. It is scarcely an exaggeration to say that he was one of the world’s foremost and greatest men of action, and that his exploits and heroism have profoundly influenced the course of history.”

Feb13 Book Launch + Dublin 036Beyond the statue of Admiral Brown, looking seaward there are reminders of the history of the old Dublin Port when ships were once moored along these docks.

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The modern Dublin Port in the distance, with these once busy quays now providing an excellent recreational, commercial and residential amenity.Feb13 Book Launch + Dublin 035Reminders of the past are all along the quay wall.

References

http://www.jeaniejohnston.ie

http://www.con-telegraph.ie

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Filed under Ireland, Irish Heritage, Irish History, Living in Ireland, Mayo Emigrants