Tag Archives: Women

International Women’s Day 2016

imageInternational Women’s Day, March 8, is a global day celebrating the social, economic, cultural and political achievements of women. The theme for 2016 is imageThe requests for individuals,corporations, public and private sectors to embrace this has gone global, and many companies have already signed up.

All over the globe events are taking place to mark International Women’s Day and in particular to highlight the need,the imperative,for equality. It is easy to find out what is happening in your local area for IWD2016, but, if like me, you are not able to take part in these organised events, it is still possible to make a mark, to advocate for parity for women from the comfort of your own home.

I am speaking of course of KIVA, that wonderful organisation that enables communities worldwide through micro loans. I am directing my loans towards women in communities who are less fortunate than those of us in the first world. I belong to a Kiva group called Genealogists for Families, inspired to do so by my friend Pauleen Cass, but you do not need to be affiliated to any group as you can lend as an individual, for as little as $25. Most times this amount will be returned to you and you can either claim the repayment or recycle the money to the benefit of another community. I like to recycle the money to women in poor communities, to supply basic needs such as toilets,or medical facilities. In this way we can take positive steps to ensure that women in poor underdeveloped countries can take steps towards parity of esteem and equality in their social structures. Whatever you do to celebrate, I wish you a happy International Women’s Day!

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Filed under International Women's Day, Ireland, Ireland and the World

International Women’s Day 2012:Connecting Girls,Inspiring Futures

A snip from my post of 2011 recalling the history of this truly international event.
The first International Women’s Day was celebrated in March 1911. It had its origins in America a few years earlier where women had come together to protest against poor working conditions, resulting in a National Women’s Day being declared by the Socialist Party of America. Subsequently at an International Conference for Working Women in Copenhagen, attended by delegates from 17 countries, and including the first 3 women elected to the Finnish Parliament, a proposal to have a special day each year to focus on women’s issues was met with unanimous approval.

Austria, Germany, Switzerland and Denmark observed the first International Women’s Day in March 1911. More than a million men and women attended rallies in support of women’s right to work, right to vote, right to hold public office. In 1913, Russian women observed International Women’s Day campaigning for peace and in 1914, other European countries joined in.

In 1917, amid great unrest in Russia caused by millions of casualties, terrible food shortages, and with many women removed from farms to work in the factories, International Women’s Day prompted 90,00 workers to strike and the army at Petrograd to revolt. Attempts to end the unrest were not successful and Tsar Nicholas II abdicated some days later. The new provisional government granted universal suffrage with equality for women.

Down the decades, the movement has continued to grow and has become a worldwide event in countries all over the world. In 25 countries it is an official holiday while in China Madagascar and Nepal it is an official holiday for women only. In many countries from Bangladesh to Guinea, from Vietnam to Iceland, from Afghanistan to Zambia, events will take place on March 8th to mark International Women’s Day. The top 5 countries for International Women’s day activity to mark the centenary on March 8th are the UK, Canada, Australia, the United States and Ireland.

International Women’s Day has evolved into a global day of celebration of the achievements of women, socially, politically, and economically. Women’s rights campaigners highlight inequalities and raise money for Charity and   Celebrities the world over associate themselves with the day.

So girls,why not find an event near you and join in the wonderful celebration!

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Filed under Celebrations in Ireland, Social Justice, Suffrage

International Women’s Day -100 Years

The first International Women’s Day was celebrated in March 1911.  It had its origins in America a few years earlier where women had come together to protest against poor working conditions, resulting in a National Women’s Day being declared by the Socialist Party of America.  Subsequently at an International Conference for Working Women in  Copenhagen, attended by delegates from 17 countries, and including  the first 3 women elected to the Finnish Parliament, a proposal to have a special day each year to focus on women’s issues was met with unanimous approval.

Austria, Germany, Switzerland and Denmark observed the first International Women’s Day in March 1911.  More than a million men and women attended rallies in support of women’s right to work, right to vote, right to hold public office.  In 1913, Russian women observed International Women’s Day campaigning for peace and in 1914, other European countries joined in.

In 1917, amid great unrest in Russia caused by millions of casualties, terrible food shortages, and with many women removed from farms to work in the factories,  International Women’s Day prompted 90,00 workers to strike and the army at Petrograd to revolt.  Attempts to end the unrest were not successful  and Tsar Nicholas II abdicated some days later. The new provisional government granted universal suffrage with equality for women.

Down the decades, the movement has continued to grow and has become a worldwide event in countries all over the world. In 25 countries it is an official holiday while in China Madagascar and Nepal it is  an official holiday for women only.  In many countries from Bangladesh to Guinea,  from Vietnam to Iceland, from Afghanistan to Zambia, events will take place on March 8th to mark  International Women’s Day. The top 5 countries for International Women’s day activity to mark the centenary on March 8th  are the  UK, Canada, Australia, the United States and Ireland.

International Women’s Day has evolved into a global day of celebration of the achievements of women, socially, politically, and economically. Women’s rights campaigners highlight inequalities and raise money for  Charity. Celebrities the world over  associate themselves with the day – Annie Lennox will lead a march in London; people will march on Capitol Hill in Washington D.C. demanding better conditions for marginalized women all over the world, Ban Ki-moon will issue a special address  from the United Nations.

Cork will celebrate historic women astronomers, Dublin will have an exhibition about  Hannah Sheehy Skeffington; Limerick hosts a photographic exhibition on the lives of women helped by Concern, Kilkenny has a business women’s lunch for charity. You can attend a tea party in Mallow, or attend a musical evening hosted by Amnesty International in PortLaoise;  you can have pancakes in Sligo or experience  Native American Ceremony in Gorey! There are dozens of other events.   If you would like to see what is in your country, your area, click here. Not all events are taking place on Tuesday the 8th, so you may manage to attend more than one! Or why not have one yourself!

Visit the website of  International Women’s Day

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Filed under Ireland, Social Change, Suffrage

The American Revolution – 1997

A few years ago, on a visit to the USA I was bemused  to occasionally see groups of women wearing red hats –  perhaps in a shopping centre, at a cinema or in a restaurant.  Intrigued by this odd phenomenon, I inquired  about who they were  and why they were wearing red hats. I was informed that they  were ‘Red Hatters’.

On reading the poem ‘Warning’ by Jenny Joseph (see it here) Sue Ellen Cooper was impressed by the lines:

‘When I am an old woman, I shall wear purple with a red hat that doesn’t go and doesn’t suit me…..’

As her friend was celebrating a birthday in November 1997, Sue Ellen presented her with a copy of the poem and an old red hat that she had bought second-hand some years earlier.  Her friend was thrilled to bits with this unusual gift, so  Sue Ellen  repeated the gesture  for several more friends.  They eventually decided to go out for tea  as a group, wearing their red hats and in purple dresses.  And so the Red Hat Society was born.   Their strange attire attracted coverage from newspapers, magazines and television  and by 2002, just 5 years later,   they had 40,000 chapters worldwide.  In 2005, the Red Hat Society even featured on The Simpsons, when Marge Simpson joined up!  They had truly ‘arrived’!

In 2010  the original red hat  and a purple boa given by Sue Ellen to her birthday friend were donated to the Smithsonian Institution National Museum of American History in Washington D.C. where they are now on display.

Donated by Founder of Red Hat Society.

The Red Hat Society  is now one of the largest women’s social groups in the world, offering friendship and fun while  celebrating life and the role of mature women.  They have managed to change the way society views women of a certain age and they promote a positive outlook on life and mental and physical well-being among their members.

They are ‘Over Fifty and Fabulous’ indeed!

Visit the website of the Red Hat Society

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Filed under Older Generation, Seniors, Social Change, Social Networking